World Economics Journal Archive

The contents of all previous issues of World Economics are listed below. Subscribers have access to the complete back issue archive: click on titles to view abstracts and full text of articles (PDF). If you are not a subscriber please visit our online store to order a subscription.


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Are Governments Overextended? Are Governments Overextended?: Assessing the spectrum of a government’s debts and its exposure to risk
Peter S. Heller , World Economics, December 2004
Have government debt levels reached dangerous levels? Certainly, for some countries, the data would suggest so. However, this paper will argue that for many governments, the amount of explicit debt on their balance sheets seriously understates the magnitude of their ... More


Responsible Growth to 2050 Responsible Growth to 2050
Kirk Hamilton & Ian Johnson, World Economics, December 2004
At plausible rates of growth in population and income per capita, world GDP in 2050 could be four times what it is today. This paper considers the benefits this growth can provide, the risks that it presents, and the building blocks required to achieve it. The author ... More


Governance Matters Governance Matters: The role of governance in Asian economic development
David E. Bloom, David Steven & Mark Weston, World Economics, December 2004
In recent years there has been a surge of interest in governance: good governance increasingly is seen as a vital adjunct to successful development efforts. This paper attempts to explain what governance is and why it is important, and assess which forms of governanc ... More


Dollarisation in Theory and Practice Dollarisation in Theory and Practice
John C. B. Cooper, World Economics, December 2004
Dollarisation involves the replacement of a soft domestic currency with a hard foreign alternative. This paper explains the different forms that dollarisation can take, its consequences for an economy, and concludes by exploring the experience of Panama, a country do ... More


The Influence of Political Distortions on Economic Performance The Influence of Political Distortions on Economic Performance: The contributions of Alberto Alesina
An interview with introduction by Brian Snowdon
World Economics, December 2004
Alberto Alesina is the Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy and Chairman of the Department of Economics at Harvard University. In this interview he discusses with Brian Snowdon his views on several important contemporary issues, including politics and the b ... More


The Economic Implications of Epidemics Old and New The Economic Implications of Epidemics Old and New
Clive Bell & Maureen Lewis, World Economics, December 2004
The outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in the winter of 2002–03 raised the specter of a new, unknown and uncontrollable infectious disease that spreads quickly and is often fatal. Certain branches of economic activity, notably tourism, felt its impa ... More


A Portrait of the Artists as Young or Old Innovators A Portrait of the Artists as Young or Old Innovators: The creative life cycles of modern poets and novelists
David Galenson, World Economics, December 2004
Earlier research found that great painters can be categorized either as young geniuses, who make sudden conceptual innovations early in their careers, or as old masters, who work experimentally, by trial and error, and arrive at their greatest contributions late in t ... More


The Bourgeois Virtues The Bourgeois Virtues
Deirdre McCloskey, World Economics, September 2004
‘Bourgeois virtue’ is not a contradiction in terms. The age of capitalism has enormously enriched the world. But the enrichment is by no means only material. The virtues enabled capitalist development; but a bourgeois life also encouraged new versions of old virtues; ... More


What Do Economists Know? What Do Economists Know?
Alan Budd, World Economics, September 2004
How would you respond to a group of high school students when asked “What do economists know?”. Alan Budd’s answers will be familiar to readers of World Economics but bear repeating. Economics, unlike, say, Physics, tends to attract beliefs and opinions by non ... More


The G-20 and the World Economy The G-20 and the World Economy
C Fred Bergsten, World Economics, September 2004
‘Globalisation’ is under attack throughout the world. However, no country has ever developed successfully without participating actively in the global economy. Countries and even whole regions that have failed to globalise, or which have ‘de-globalised’, have lagged. ... More


What a Consumer Price Index Can’t Do What a Consumer Price Index Can’t Do
Ralph Turvey, World Economics, September 2004
A monthly consumer price index traces changes in the monthly cost of a year’s consumption using a sample of prices. But in some months the prices that can be sampled will temporarily exclude some of the products that were bought in the base year, Christmas trees prov ... More


Globalisation, Economic Progress and New Millennium Collectivism Globalisation, Economic Progress and New Millennium Collectivism: A review article
David Henderson, World Economics, September 2004
Three major studies of globalisation and its effects have recently been published. One of these is the report of an international commission of eminent persons. The other two are books by leading economists, one by Jagdish Bhagwati and the other by Martin Wolf. David ... More


Asian Drama Asian Drama: The pursuit of modernisation in India and Indonesia
Tim Lankester, World Economics, September 2004
The now largely forgotten book Asian Drama: An Inquiry into the Poverty of Nations by Swedish social scientist Gunnar Myrdal was published in 1968. Myrdal called his book “Asian Drama” because of the tensions he saw being played out in Asia between modern idea ... More


Pricing Cultural Heritage Pricing Cultural Heritage: A new approach to managing ancient resources
Susana Mourato, Ece Ozdemiroglu, Tannis Hett & Giles Atkinson, World Economics, September 2004
A growing determinant of leisure travel decisions has been the demand for cultural destinations. This has presented complex challenges with regards to the correct management of major cultural resources. Management options can be assessed in terms of three criteria of ... More


Does European Union Environmental Policy Pass a Cost–Benefit Test? Does European Union Environmental Policy Pass a Cost–Benefit Test?
David Pearce, World Economics, September 2004
Most European Union countries are committed to some form of regulatory impact assessment, and in some cases these assessments involve the formal use of cost–benefit analysis. The European Treaty of Union also calls for a comparison of costs and benefits for all Europ ... More


European Financial Market Integration European Financial Market Integration: Distant dream or nascent reality?
Patrice Muller, World Economics, September 2004
European Monetary Union and a vigorous legislative agenda have profoundly changed the environment in which the European financial services industry operates. These developments should have contributed to a deepening of financial market integration in the European Uni ... More


Monetarism Revisited Monetarism Revisited
Allan Meltzer, World Economics, September 2004
Allan Meltzer responds to the article by Thomas Mayer and Patrick Minford, ‘Monetarism: A Retrospective’ that appeared in World Economics, Vol. 5, No. 2 (April–June), 2004, pp. 147–185. ... More


Monetarism: A Response Monetarism: A Response
Meghnad Desai, World Economics, September 2004
Meghnad Desai responds to the article by Thomas Mayer and Patrick Minford, ‘Monetarism: A Retrospective’ that appeared in World Economics, Vol. 5, No. 2 (April–June), 2004, pp. 147–185. ... More


Monetarism in Retrospect — and Prospect Monetarism in Retrospect — and Prospect
Andrew G Haldane, World Economics, September 2004
Andrew Haldane responds to the article by Thomas Mayer and Patrick Minford, ‘Monetarism: A Retrospective’ that appeared in World Economics, Vol. 5, No. 2 (April–June), 2004, pp. 147–185. ... More


Monetarism: A Rejoinder Monetarism: A Rejoinder
Tim Congdon, World Economics, September 2004
Tim Congdon responds to the article by Thomas Mayer and Patrick Minford, ‘Monetarism: A Retrospective’ that appeared in World Economics, Vol. 5, No. 2 (April–June), 2004, pp. 147–185. ... More


The Quest for Development The Quest for Development: What role does history play?
Areendam Chanda & Louis Putterman, World Economics, June 2004
It may be no coincidence that those countries that grew most rapidly in the late twentieth century—including South Korea, China, and, of late, India—were relatively developed civilizations when Western Europe began its overseas expansion five centuries ago. In this a ... More


Globalisation and the Asia–Pacific Revival Globalisation and the Asia–Pacific Revival
Arne Bigsten, World Economics, June 2004
This paper reviews evidence on the evolution of international economic integration of Asia–Pacific countries, and discusses the extent to which this explains their recent growth success. It starts with a review of some theoretical arguments in the growth and globalis ... More


The Health and Wealth of Africa The Health and Wealth of Africa
David E. Bloom & David Canning, World Economics, June 2004
Among Africa’s problems, chronic poverty and poor health stand out. Traditional development thinking has maintained that health improvements are a consequence of income growth. But new evidence shows that investing in health, with the aid of the international communi ... More


Explaining the ‘Great Divergence’ Explaining the ‘Great Divergence’: Daron Acemoglu on how growth theorists rediscovered history and the importance of institutions
An interview with introduction by Brian Snowdon
World Economics, June 2004
Daron Acemoglu is Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In this interview he discusses with Brian Snowdon some of his recent research findings that confirm the key role played by ‘good’ and ‘bad’ institutions in determining the economic ... More


Fifty Years of Economic Growth in Western Europe Fifty Years of Economic Growth in Western Europe: No longer catching up but falling behind?
Nicholas Crafts, World Economics, June 2004
Productivity growth in virtually all west European countries exceeded that of the United States throughout the period 1950 to 1995. Since then American productivity performance has strengthened and that of the EU has weakened. The most important reason is contrasting ... More


Monetarism Monetarism: A retrospective
Thomas Mayer & Patrick Minford, World Economics, June 2004
This paper offers a retrospective on the monetarist debate started by Milton Friedman in the 1950s, discussing both monetarist theory and policy recommendations. While the inability to find a controllable monetary aggregate with a velocity that can be accurately pred ... More


The End of the Road for the WTO? The End of the Road for the WTO?: A snapshot of international trade policy after Cancun
Razeen Sally, World Economics, March 2004
The collapse of the Doha Round in Cancun is symptomatic of a wider malaise in the WTO. It has an overloaded agenda, and is becoming excessively legalised and politicised. The “UN-isation” of the WTO proceeds apace. Its decisionmaking mechanism is crippled. It is ther ... More


International Aid International Aid: Experience, prospects and the moral case
Tim Lankester, World Economics, March 2004
This article describes the main reasons why aid has not been as effective at addressing the world’s poverty problem as it could have been: lack of will on the part of donors, inadequate policies and governance on the part of recipients, and a lack of understanding of ... More


Escaping Regulation, Escaping Convention Escaping Regulation, Escaping Convention: Development strategies in small economies
Naren Prasad, World Economics, March 2004
Contrary to widely held belief, small island countries have many lessons to offer to other countries and the world community in terms of their development strategies. This article provides evidence that small island countries are experts at breaking and distorting gl ... More


Beyond the Ivory Tower Beyond the Ivory Tower: Stanley Fischer on the economics of contemporary global issues
An interview with introduction by Brian Snowdon
World Economics, March 2004
Stanley Fischer had a long and distinguished career as an academic economist at MIT, and was Vice President, Development Economics and Chief Economist at the World Bank, before becoming First Deputy Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund in 1994. He is ... More


Does the IMF Perform a Catalytic Role? Does the IMF Perform a Catalytic Role?: And what if it doesn’t?
Graham Bird & Dane Rowlands, World Economics, March 2004
The IMF advertises itself as playing a catalytic role, whereby its lending programmes induce other providers of finance to invest or lend as well. The theoretical foundations of this claim are reviewed and found to be questionable. The empirical evidence also appears ... More


A Single European Market in Asset Management A Single European Market in Asset Management: Vision and reality
Friedrich Heinemann, World Economics, March 2004
In spite of progress with integration, the European single market is still far from perfect. In particular, financial services markets are still heavily segmented along national borders—even in the era of the Internet and the Euro. In order to understand the reasons ... More


The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics: A biographical guide to potential future winners
Howard R. Vane & Chris Mulhearn, World Economics, March 2004
In October 2003 the latest recipients of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics were announced. Since its inception in 1969, 53 economists have been awarded the Prize. A closer look at the biographical details of the Nobel Memorial Laureates—including their broad fiel ... More