Is there a Case for an Asian Monetary Fund?

Graham Bird & Ramkishen Rajan

Published: June 2000

The East Asian financial crisis has spawned a number of proposals for institutional reform. Some envisage reforming existing institutions, particularly the International Monetary Fund (IMF), while others suggest that new institutions are needed. Amongst them is the idea of establishing an Asian Monetary Fund (AMF). Evaluating this proposal raises a number of complex issues. Its appeal hinges on whether it would be able to undertake some functions better than the IMF. To the extent that crises are regionally contained, there may be a case for mobilising finance to help deal with them at the regional level. This could also take pressure off the constrained resources of the IMF. In as much as access to finance from an AMF would be conditional upon compliance with specified standards and policy guidelines, an AMF might also help to prevent a future financial crisis in the region.

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