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George C. Georgiou
George C. Georgiou
George C. Georgiou, a Fulbright Scholar, is a Professor of Economics at Towson University. Dr. Georgiou holds a B.A. in Economics from Drew University and a MPh in Economics and a PhD in Economics from The George Washington University. Dr. Georgiou has written widely in the areas of Energy Economics, International Trade and Investment, and the Economics of Education in such publications as: The World Economy, Journal of Economic Development, Energy Policy, Mediterranean Quarterly, Atlantic Economic Journal, Journal of International Economic Integration, Integracion Latinoamericana, International Advances in Economic Research, Journal of Business and Economic Studies, Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, International Business & Economics Research Journal, International Journal of Education Research, International Finance and Banking, Etudes Helleniques/Helenic Studies, and World Policy Journal. Dr. Georgiou has presented papers at professional conferences such as: the American Economic Association, Western Economic Association, Eastern Economic Association, International Atlantic Economic Association, International Business Education & Technology Association, International Applied Business and Research Association, International Academy of Business and Public Administration Disciplines, and the National Council on Economic Education. Dr. Georgiou has held teaching positions at: Towson University, The George Washington University, The National Defense University, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, University of Maryland University College, Marymount University of Virginia, and the University of Baltimore.

  Click to view all papers by George C. Georgiou on World Economics.


A Statistician’s Ordeal: The Case of Andreas Georgiou
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Miranda Xafa, World Economics, September 2019
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A Statistician’s Ordeal - The Case of Andreas Georgiou
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Miranda Xafa, World Economics, September 2019
For the past eight years Andreas Georgiou has been facing prosecution for the way he discharged his duties while he was president of Greece’s statistical agency (ELSTAT) in 2010-15. His detractors claim that Greece was forced to face harsher conditionality because the deficit was revised upwards, thus helping to justify externally imposed austerity. Despite overwhelming evidence that Mr. Georgiou correctly applied EU rules in revising Greece’s fiscal deficit and debt figures, and despite strong international support for his case, some Greek courts continued the pursuit. The Georgiou case tested the independence of the Greek judiciary, as some senior prosecutors and judges would appear to have repeatedly failed to act in accordance with the rule of law and due process. With a solid majority in parliament, the newly-elected center-right New Democracy government has the opportunity to deliver deep institutional and economic reforms. Ensuring the independence of the judiciary should be a top priority.
The European Union Must Defend Andreas Georgiou
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Nicolas Véron, World Economics, March 2019
In August 2010, Andreas Georgiou, former President of the Hellenic Statistical Authority, was charged with having harmed Greece's national interests. In this paper, Nicolas Veron argues that the relentless prosecutions against Georgiou are more than a matter of shameful harassment by Greece. Georgiou’s case also raises disturbing questions about the integrity of European statistical processes. The European Union also needs to consider reforming its statistical framework to ensure a similar scandal cannot recur.
Beyond the Shadow Economy
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George C. Georgiou, World Economics, September 2017
Money laundering is illegal world-wide and constitutes a significant economic inefficiency. Current anti-money laundering and combating the financing (AML/CFT) efforts are primarily driven by the threat of terrorism and drug-trafficking, but the majority of illicit money flows is due to fraud. This paper assesses the costs and benefits of controls on the efficiency of the financial system in modern advanced economies and the less developed economies of the world. The significant costs imposed on financial institutions, increasing levels of regulation and the minuscule illicit money flows intercepted has resulted in moral hazard and significant conflicts of interest.

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