Search:

World Economics

Search results for:

Migration
Displaying: 1-2 of 2

Measuring EU-Wide Inequality
    Read Paper
Michael Dauderstädt, World Economics, June 2020
EU-wide inequality is higher than official figures by Eurostat suggest. With a Gini coefficient of 0.35 and a quintile ratio of 8.4 in 2018 (5.8 at purchasing power parity), it reaches the level of US inequality. This is a major driver of migration and relocation of production within the European Union (EU), both of which have led to a rise of nativist votes and Brexit. Relative inequality has been declining owing to catch-up growth of the poorer economies in central and eastern Europe, while within-country inequality has remained stable or increased. However, absolute inequality is likely not to decline for many years.
Whatever Happened to Africa’s Rapid Urbanisation?
    Read Paper
Dr Deborah Potts, World Economics, June 2012
It is widely believed that urbanisation is occurring faster in sub-Saharan Africa than anywhere else in the world, as migrants move from rural to urban settlements. This is a fallacy. While the populations of numerous urban areas are growing rapidly, the urbanisation levels of many countries are increasing slowly – if at all. Natural increase, rather than net in-migration, is the predominant growth factor in most urban populations. African governments, policymakers and international donors need to acknowledge fundamental changes in urbanisation trends, and respond to the irrefutable messages these impart about urban employment, incomes and economic development.

Displaying: 1-2 of 2